09 632 1138 info@iwh.co.nz
Planning your OE?  Welcome to International Working Holidays
 
 
 

Update from Namibia

Update from Namibia

Author -  Vicki Kenny

Leopard caught in trap, 4 week old Zebra, Baby Baboon and an Ardwolf!

January 28th 2017, saw the founders of the Sanctuary cover the many miles to the northern reaches of Namibia, in a bid to respond to the conflict concerns of a farmer making a living with livestock. 

A powerful predator, a magnificent male leopard, had been caught in a capture cage, too close for comfort to the protective night kraal where the farmer was keeping his calves safe overnight.

jan rescue leopard 2.jpg

To allay the farmer’s fears and avoid potential conflict in the future, the mighty male, weighing a whopping 60kg and in prime health, was sedated and fitted with a GPS collar, before being transported to a protected area, an area where the chance of recurring conflict remains low.

jan rescue leopard.jpg

The movements of this leopard are now closely monitored on a daily basis, providing Sanctuary’s research team with invaluable data that significantly adds to the echelons of carnivore conflict research.

Meet Demi the orphaned Baboon

demi the baby baboon.jpg

Meet Demi, the first orphaned baby baboon of 2017. 

The trauma of losing her mum compounded by a broken leg, she desperately needed sanctuary solace and rehabilitative refuge.

Using the surgical facilities of a veterinary hospital in Windhoek, Namibia’s capital city, the Sanctuary vet tended to the broken bones, giving Demi the chance to re-embrace her playful primate antics. 

Demi at the vet hospital

As tiny as our tot may be, she has certainly proven that dynamite comes in small packages, her broken leg healing almost miraculously and her rough play keeping her fellow baboon youngsters on their toes. Our daring Demi can now look forward to the brightest possible future.

Demi at the vet hospital

Welcome to Wollie

Francois, the amazing aardwolf whose mum was killed by a suspected predator, was delighted to meet his female counterpart, Wollie. Having inadvertently been fed the incorrect diet by her original rescuers, Wollie now relies on the Sanctuary founder's animal expertise and knowledge of nurturing wild orphans back to prime health, and is making a remarkable recovery at the Sanctuary. 

aardwolf 3.jpg

if you're interested in learning more about Rescue and Rehabilitation - there are limited spaces on The Rescue and Rehabilitation Course specifically for wildlife in Namibia.

Meet Mangwe

Another striped surprise took the sanctuary by storm on January 29 in the form of Mangwe, an approximately four week old mountain zebra foal. 

Isn't she adorable?

zebra baby.jpg

Motherless and alone, Mangwe was quickly succumbing to starvation on the outskirts of Windhoek, her zebra herd nowhere in sight. But, as always, the Wildlife Sanctuary team sprang into action, nimbly rigging a home for our foal and immediately encouraging her to suckle milk so vital to her survival. Mangwe is settling in well, her strength increasing by the day, and we can so clearly imagine her future of freedom on the Sanctuary reserve.

Find our more about becoming a volunteer at this amazing Wildlife Sanctuary in Namibia. 

Update from Namibia

Lots of rescues this last month at the Namibia Wildlife Sanctuary. An Aardwolf, a baby zebra, a leopard and a baboon! How did it all end?

Leopard caught in trap, 4 week old Zebra, Baby Baboon and an Ardwolf!

January 28th 2017, saw the founders of the Sanctuary cover the many miles to the northern reaches of Namibia, in a bid to respond to the conflict concerns of a farmer making a living with livestock. 

A powerful predator, a magnificent male leopard, had been caught in a capture cage, too close for comfort to the protective night kraal where the farmer was keeping his calves safe overnight.

jan rescue leopard 2.jpg

To allay the farmer’s fears and avoid potential conflict in the future, the mighty male, weighing a whopping 60kg and in prime health, was sedated and fitted with a GPS collar, before being transported to a protected area, an area where the chance of recurring conflict remains low.

jan rescue leopard.jpg

The movements of this leopard are now closely monitored on a daily basis, providing Sanctuary’s research team with invaluable data that significantly adds to the echelons of carnivore conflict research.

Meet Demi the orphaned Baboon

demi the baby baboon.jpg

Meet Demi, the first orphaned baby baboon of 2017. 

The trauma of losing her mum compounded by a broken leg, she desperately needed sanctuary solace and rehabilitative refuge.

Using the surgical facilities of a veterinary hospital in Windhoek, Namibia’s capital city, the Sanctuary vet tended to the broken bones, giving Demi the chance to re-embrace her playful primate antics. 

Demi at the vet hospital

As tiny as our tot may be, she has certainly proven that dynamite comes in small packages, her broken leg healing almost miraculously and her rough play keeping her fellow baboon youngsters on their toes. Our daring Demi can now look forward to the brightest possible future.

Demi at the vet hospital

Welcome to Wollie

Francois, the amazing aardwolf whose mum was killed by a suspected predator, was delighted to meet his female counterpart, Wollie. Having inadvertently been fed the incorrect diet by her original rescuers, Wollie now relies on the Sanctuary founder's animal expertise and knowledge of nurturing wild orphans back to prime health, and is making a remarkable recovery at the Sanctuary. 

aardwolf 3.jpg

if you're interested in learning more about Rescue and Rehabilitation - there are limited spaces on The Rescue and Rehabilitation Course specifically for wildlife in Namibia.

Meet Mangwe

Another striped surprise took the sanctuary by storm on January 29 in the form of Mangwe, an approximately four week old mountain zebra foal. 

Isn't she adorable?

zebra baby.jpg

Motherless and alone, Mangwe was quickly succumbing to starvation on the outskirts of Windhoek, her zebra herd nowhere in sight. But, as always, the Wildlife Sanctuary team sprang into action, nimbly rigging a home for our foal and immediately encouraging her to suckle milk so vital to her survival. Mangwe is settling in well, her strength increasing by the day, and we can so clearly imagine her future of freedom on the Sanctuary reserve.

Find our more about becoming a volunteer at this amazing Wildlife Sanctuary in Namibia. 

Update from Namibia

What do you think? Love to hear your comments!

Name *
Subscribe
Comment *

Blog Tags

 
 
We'll find you the perfect job overseas.
 
Copyright © 2001 - Nannies Abroad Limited trading as International Working Holidays. All rights reserved  |  Website Design by Labyrinth Solutions  |  Content Management by Contegro
International Working Holidays™, International Working Holidays Logo, Nannies Abroad™ and Nannies Abroad Logo are trade marks of Nannies Abroad Limited trading as International Working Holidays.