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Rapid Response Team Work - Namibia Wildlife Project

Rapid Response Team Work - Namibia Wildlife Project

Author -  Vicki Kenny

September saw the spotted ones keeping the Rapid Response Unit in action at our amazing Wildlife Sanctuary.

International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-5.png

Neuras, which is the prime carnivore research site at the Wildlife Sanctuary in Namibia, had the team totally awestruck with a powerful predator – a 60kg male leopard! 

He was suspected of livestock predation, and he had wandered into the trap cage purposefully set up in a bid to capture and collar this amazing animal and start the vital process of tracking his movements and behaviours. This is a process that the project hopes will show that this big cat is a non-conflict animal.

International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-13.png

After sedating the impressive carnivore, a GPS collar was fitted and the reversal drugs administered, before the magnificent male dashed back into the wild of Namibia, his formidable form disappearing into the desert landscapes.

But the rapid response action continued, 

this time with a concerned farmer requesting the Wildlife Sanctuary's assistance with another prime predator – a 58kg male leopard who roams his lands and whose known movements will provide peace of mind to a man whose livelihood is his livestock. 

Without delay, the team dashed to the location and once again put their expertise into practice, sedating and GPS collaring a carnivore eager to re-embrace his freedom.

International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-11.png International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-10.png

Why are these leopards being collared?

The desperate cry of Namibia’s vulnerable wildlife prompted The Wildlife Sanctuary to embark on a scientific journey – a journey whereby human-wildlife conflict is researched and subsequently tackled as intensively as possible, the scientific data resulting from the GPS collaring of wild carnivores providing a platform from which to systematically address the complex facets of conflict. 

Free-roaming carnivores face an ongoing battle in their quest to peacefully co-exist with farmers and landowners, with elephants and the highly endangered African wild dog also in critical need of help. The Sanctuary's conflict mitigation research has already prevented the persecution of countless magnificent felines and is further helping with the plight of so many of Namibia’s threatened wildlife species.

Find out how you can join the team and volunteer at this project in Namibia

Rapid Response Team Work - Namibia Wildlife Project

The Rapid Response Team at the Wildlife Sanctuary we send volunteers to in Namibia had an interesting September! If you love leopards then you need to see what happened.

September saw the spotted ones keeping the Rapid Response Unit in action at our amazing Wildlife Sanctuary.

International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-5.png

Neuras, which is the prime carnivore research site at the Wildlife Sanctuary in Namibia, had the team totally awestruck with a powerful predator – a 60kg male leopard! 

He was suspected of livestock predation, and he had wandered into the trap cage purposefully set up in a bid to capture and collar this amazing animal and start the vital process of tracking his movements and behaviours. This is a process that the project hopes will show that this big cat is a non-conflict animal.

International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-13.png

After sedating the impressive carnivore, a GPS collar was fitted and the reversal drugs administered, before the magnificent male dashed back into the wild of Namibia, his formidable form disappearing into the desert landscapes.

But the rapid response action continued, 

this time with a concerned farmer requesting the Wildlife Sanctuary's assistance with another prime predator – a 58kg male leopard who roams his lands and whose known movements will provide peace of mind to a man whose livelihood is his livestock. 

Without delay, the team dashed to the location and once again put their expertise into practice, sedating and GPS collaring a carnivore eager to re-embrace his freedom.

International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-11.png International Working Holidays Volunteer Project Namibia-10.png

Why are these leopards being collared?

The desperate cry of Namibia’s vulnerable wildlife prompted The Wildlife Sanctuary to embark on a scientific journey – a journey whereby human-wildlife conflict is researched and subsequently tackled as intensively as possible, the scientific data resulting from the GPS collaring of wild carnivores providing a platform from which to systematically address the complex facets of conflict. 

Free-roaming carnivores face an ongoing battle in their quest to peacefully co-exist with farmers and landowners, with elephants and the highly endangered African wild dog also in critical need of help. The Sanctuary's conflict mitigation research has already prevented the persecution of countless magnificent felines and is further helping with the plight of so many of Namibia’s threatened wildlife species.

Find out how you can join the team and volunteer at this project in Namibia

Rapid Response Team Work - Namibia Wildlife Project

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